NSX and the Relentless Pursuit of What’s Next

Back when 56k was blowing minds, David Monteclaro was already thinking gigabit.

David Monteclaro’s first job was with US Robotics, then the #1 modem manufacturer in the world. He rode the hyper-growth all the way to Intel’s enterprise networking division.
How much of your career has been reacting to change vs. driving it?

I’ve always tried to stay ahead of technology changes, but it wasn’t until 2014 that I saw that the cloud model was going to change everything. I focused on learning VMware because the speed at which IT was changing was going to be directly related to the reduced provisioning time brought about with cloud computing. I knew the cost savings and performance increases through ESX and NSX would lead the way for IT infrastructure. Now I’m at Intel, working on NFV products that will accelerate the data center even more. I can look many years ahead and know that the boldest predictions will be surpassed.

What does NSX Mindset mean to you?

It means embracing and reshaping all of IT, because everything is moving to a Software-Defined Networking (SDN) model. If an IT professional doesn’t understand SDN connectivity of the future, they won’t appreciate that entire data centers now reside in code. The transition to that reality is happening at blazing speed, so having the NSX Mindset is preparing for that monumental shift.

I focused on learning VMware because the speed at which IT was changing was going to be directly related to the reduced provisioning time brought about with cloud computing.
What does a united IT strategy mean to you?

It means aligning DevOps to realistic timelines by way of IT operations choosing the NSX path vs. another competitor’s vision of the data center. The creation of new networks—and the speed at which they will be provisioned going forward—will be determined by the network infrastructure, and software development teams will rely on self-service in the enterprise cloud from the mission-critical designs set forth from IT operations. The strategy and technology products selected for that strategy must be united for the proper execution of company objectives. Otherwise, realistic milestones for projects cannot be projected with accuracy to meet business deadlines.

How has network virtualization changed your organization and your career?

It helped me secure my current position at Intel where I’m helping to drive innovations in network technology that haven’t been made public. At the same time, I’m helping Intel’s enterprise customers using the current 25G/50G/100G technologies with their testing and troubleshooting.

I’ve always tried to stay ahead with technology changes, but it wasn’t until 2014 that I saw that the cloud model was going to change everything.
How do you stay ahead of the constant changes and advancements in IT?

I like to read, so I’m always researching what’s the latest with tech companies advancing their products for higher performance and lowest cost. When disruptive technologies are being widely adopted, it allows me to see what’s being validated by IT professionals, and which ones are likely to increase their market share in the industry. My background in finance also helps me determine what solutions have a higher chance at success versus others by analyzing the price/performance metrics.

What was your aha moment that led you down the path of NSX?

I saw the demo of Nicira after it was bought by VMware. I watched a lot of videos of Martin Casado on YouTube, and I knew at that moment VMware made a brilliant acquisition, which eventually became NSX. I felt that network virtualization would explode in usage the same way server virtualization did, which is why I worked towards my VMware Network Virtualization (NV) certifications from then on. Listening to Martin Casado allowed me to see the value of the VMware NV certification track very early.

NSX customer growth has proven to be more than my expectations, and I was glad to have seen it coming, back in 2014.